Chocolate Feelings

February 14th, Thursday:
DSCN4296
  • Shoyu Veggie Ramen (Ramen Noodles, Pork, Bean Sprout, Chinese Cabbage, Bamboo Shoot, Green Onion, Carrot)
  • Milk
  • Veggieburger
  • Chocolate Feelings
  • Kcal: 799
Chocolate is made from the seed of the cocoa plant (cocoa beans). Slab chocolate like we eat nowadays was first introduced in 1847, before that chocolate was drunk.
The name of today’s dessert is “Chocotto kimochi”, which literally means “a little bit of emotion”. But “choco” and “mochi” are written in katakana, which read together means, of course, “chocolate mochi”. So itis assorted of pun.
Today is St. Valentine’s Day and I received some chocolate. One was from one of my students (pictured) and the other was from the head of the Rokugo Post Office. Yeah for living in a small town!
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There were a couple characters I wasn’t sure about in yesterday’s translation of the curry recipe, so today I was able to ask the Japanese teacher at Rokugo about it. It turns out two were abbreviated characters (トキ and コト) and the other is apparently not understandable even to experts. So thank you Rokugo!
しょうゆ野菜ラーメン
牛乳
野菜のハンバーグ
チョコっときモチ
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About Motowori

黄心梅がうまいぞ!

3 responses to “Chocolate Feelings

  1. milkljapan

    Happy Valentine’s Day:)
    トキ and コト in the curry recipe yesterday? Is it not as simple as “when” or “then” for トキ, and “do boil” for 煮ルコト? Perhaps you know Japanese more than me…

    • tenmen

      Happy Valentine’s Day!
      You musn’t look at my typed up version, but the photograph from the original book. トキ is written with a character that looks like キ with an extra vertical stroke to the left. コト is written with a character that looks like コ without the last stoke. These abbreviated characters cannot be typed on the computer, so I replaced them with what they mean in my typed up version.

      • I got what you meant finally! wow, Japanese in Meiji period was using these abbreviations! It seems convenient if we still use those for トキ and コト, since we use those two words quite often, though it might just make Japanese language a little more difficult…

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