2 Mikan Jelly Mix

August 29th, Wednesday:

  • Curry Rice (Pork, Potato, Carrot, Onion)
  • Mame Piyo
  • 2 Mikan Jelly Mix (Mandarin Orange, Sweet Chinese Grapefruit, Gelatin Block)
  • Oven Baked Edamame and Corn Dumpling
  • kcal: 998

The 2 Mikan Jelly Mix has both Satsuma Mandarins and Sweet Chinese Grapefruit in it. It is fun to try and savour the different flavours and textures, isn’t it!

Today, we ate lunch early (after third period) since there was a bus to catch to a special presentation of the musical “The Wizard of Oz”. The message of the musical–though your hometown may have nothing but cows and wheat fields in it, it is still precious as your beloved hometown–is relevant to my students here. That said, this special schedule meant we had less than 15 minutes in which to consume our curry lunch. My relatives, when I have seen them, have commented on the lightning speed at which I now eat. I firmly blame this newly developed habit upon the fact I eat school lunch everyday. Even on a normal day, the actually time for eating is on average 15 minutes.

Anyway, Mame Piyo (lit. Bean Chirp) is the brand name of the chocolate flavoured soymilk we had in lunch today. Usually, dairy being one on the  main products of my town, normal milk is served at lunch. But on certain occasions, fruit/vegetable juice or mame piyo is served. As I’ve mentioned before, I cannot drink milk, so I am always quite happy when soymilk is served in its place. When I was student in my hometown, we were also served milk with school lunch everyday. On special occasions we did get chocolate milk. I also seem to recall there was a juice option, probably POG (ie: Passionfruit, Orange, Guava), which came in a short plastic cup, rather than a carton like the milk did.

カレーライス
豆ぴよ
2種のみかんゼリーよせ
枝豆コーンのオーブン焼き

Vegetable Curry Rice

June 6th, Wednesday:

  • Vegetable Curry Rice (Potato, Eggplant, Carrot, Onion, Green Bean)
  • Milk
  • Mixed Fruit Jello (Block Jelly, Pineapple, Mandarin Orange, Jello, Nata de coco)
  • Spinach Omelet

Nata de coco is made from solidified coconut milk and is a traditional food of the Philippines. By sight, it resembles kanten gelatin, but you can easily tell it’s not by the characteristic gummy texture.

Although my beloved hometown is in the tropics and coconuts were bounteous throughout my childhood, I ate nata de coco for the first time in Japan. From what I understand, it first become very popular in Japan, and nowhere else, in 1993. Today, it is no longer a fad, but has an established placed as a dessert in Japan. Nata de coco is really quite delicious and I enjoy the texture, although I could see how some people might not. It seems to be made by fermenting the coconut milk. The name comes from Spanish, meaning “cream of Coconut”.

While, I didn’t eat nata de coco as a child, I did eat my fair share of coconut pudding. They don’t resemble each other in texture at all, but they are both desserts made from coconut, so I think it counts. Coconut pudding, which is made from coconut milk, water, and sugar and thickened with starch, is far better than it’s milk-based sister for two reasons. One is that it doesn’t leave that gross residue that milk-based products do in your mouth, and the other is of course that lactose intolerant people can eat it.